Serendipity

serendipity |ˌserənˈdipitē|
noun
the occurrence and development of events by chance in a happy or beneficial way : a fortunate stroke of serendipity | a series of small serendipities. Since 1996

July 29, 2014 at 2:24am
198,039 notes
Reblogged from meladz3
fhauly:

WHO ARE YOU WHO IS THIS GOODNESS

fhauly:

WHO ARE YOU WHO IS THIS GOODNESS

(Source: meladz3, via baebly)

July 27, 2014 at 4:44pm
67,967 notes
Reblogged from clientsfromhell

clientsfromhell:

Me: “What browser are you on?”

Client: “Google.”

Me: “Google Chrome?”

Client: “No, just regular Google.”

Me: “That’s the site. I want to know the browser.”

Client: “Google.”

Me: “No.”

Client: “Look, we can have this conversation forever, man. But when I hit the internet logo, Google comes up!”

Me: “Okay…What does that “internet logo” look like?

Client: “…A fiery fox, I guess. But that’s irrelevant.”

(via baebly)

July 23, 2014 at 1:57pm
47,750 notes
Reblogged from nova-r

nova-r:

i need a new bra, looks like it’s time to take out a fucking loan

(via nakedcuddles)

1:56pm
87,141 notes
Reblogged from daft-pun

wtgeoff:

daft-pun:

The Breakfast Club, then and now.

This is amazing

(via waywardprincess)

1:55pm
60,725 notes
Reblogged from iwannazarryyou

lovedbyliam:

#real life character development x

(Source: iwannazarryyou, via han-rawr)

1:54pm
113,265 notes
Reblogged from rhaegare

(Source: rhaegare, via heartbreaks)

1:54pm
46,866 notes
Reblogged from unusual-entities

Claiming there is no other life in the universe is like scooping up some water, looking at the cup and claiming there are no whales in the ocean.

— Neil deGrasse Tyson in response to “Aliens can’t exist because we haven’t found them yet” (via unusual-entities)

(via anastasiabeeverhousan)

1:53pm
47,137 notes
Reblogged from t-sukix

You may not see it today or tomorrow, but you will look back in a few years and be absolutely perplexed and awed by how every little thing added up and brought you somewhere wonderful - or where you always wanted to be. You will be grateful that things didn’t work out the way you once wanted them to.

— Unknown  (via self-loved)

(Source: t-sukix, via armouring)

1:52pm
929,691 notes
Reblogged from forever90s
alahale:

holy shit he is sex

alahale:

holy shit he is sex

(via sea-faerie)

1:52pm
5,134 notes
Reblogged from fishingboatproceeds
fishingboatproceeds:

beingthebesttryingtobebetter:

fishingboatproceeds:

This thing looks like a huge thermos, and it is. By keeping rotavirus and pneumonia vaccines cold for 50 days, it saves kids’ lives. I saw it work perfectly in a rural health outpost with no running water or electricity, just an amazing health worker using technology suited to her needs.

There are coolers that keep sperm and eggs frozen for decades.

Yeah, but those coolers need electricity, something in very short supply in rural Ethiopia. (More than 60 million Ethiopians live outside or urban centers, and most of them—and most of the health centers that serve them—are without power or running water.) There are refrigerators that use propane or gas to keep cool, but propane can be expensive and difficult to keep in steady supply, so these ridiculously efficient Thermoses are (literally) a life-saver.
It’s difficult to overstate the poverty here: Most of the plowing of fields is done with wooden plows drawn by cattle, and there are almost no cars on the roads. (Most people travel by foot or on handmade carts drawn by animals). That Ethiopia has been able to reduce under-5 mortality from 25% to 8% in the past 20 years despite this poverty and a very rural population is a tremendous success story, and with effectively outfitted health posts, that percentage will get even lower—hopefully within the next decade Ethiopia’s child mortality rate will fall below the current world average of 5%.

fishingboatproceeds:

beingthebesttryingtobebetter:

fishingboatproceeds:

This thing looks like a huge thermos, and it is. By keeping rotavirus and pneumonia vaccines cold for 50 days, it saves kids’ lives. I saw it work perfectly in a rural health outpost with no running water or electricity, just an amazing health worker using technology suited to her needs.

There are coolers that keep sperm and eggs frozen for decades.

Yeah, but those coolers need electricity, something in very short supply in rural Ethiopia. (More than 60 million Ethiopians live outside or urban centers, and most of them—and most of the health centers that serve them—are without power or running water.) There are refrigerators that use propane or gas to keep cool, but propane can be expensive and difficult to keep in steady supply, so these ridiculously efficient Thermoses are (literally) a life-saver.

It’s difficult to overstate the poverty here: Most of the plowing of fields is done with wooden plows drawn by cattle, and there are almost no cars on the roads. (Most people travel by foot or on handmade carts drawn by animals). That Ethiopia has been able to reduce under-5 mortality from 25% to 8% in the past 20 years despite this poverty and a very rural population is a tremendous success story, and with effectively outfitted health posts, that percentage will get even lower—hopefully within the next decade Ethiopia’s child mortality rate will fall below the current world average of 5%.